The Common Ankle Sprain
October 3, 2018
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The Dangers of Ankle Injuries

As long as you have a foot, you can hurt your ankle. While many ankle injuries occur during athletic activities, all it takes is an awkward landing or a quick twist to hurt your ankle. Sprains, strains, and fractures can happen to anyone, so it’s important to know about the dangers of ankle injuries and what you can do to prevent them.

Types of Ankle Injuries

Ankle sprains and other ankle injuries are very common but can have a wide range of recovery timelines. A small ankle roll can take a day or two to feel better, but more serious injuries may last for weeks. Ankle injuries can occur in one of three different parts:

  • Ligaments
  • Tendons
  • Bones

Ankle Sprains

Sprains occur when one of your ligaments is stretched too far. This can range from very small tears to a complete tear. Ligament tears can occur when your foot rolls underneath your leg. This can happen during a walk on uneven, unstable ground, while playing sports, and many other regular activities.

Ankle Strains

Strains occur when muscles and tendons are stretched are pulled beyond their capacity. Certain muscles are meant to help move and stabilize the ankle, and these muscles can become inflamed and torn from sudden acts of force or other damaging acts.

Ankle Fractures

Ankle fractures are breaks in the bones that make up your ankle joint. Undue stress can cause fractures in your ankle bones. Break can occur along with ligament tears thanks to nasty rolls, twists, or impacts.

Ankle Injury Prevention and Treatment

You can’t always stop your foot from rolling, but you can take measures to reduce your chances of ankle injuries and limit stress on your feet.

  • Wear good, supportive footwear
  • Wrap your foot and ankle to increase stability during physical activities
  • Do foot and ankle stretches and exercises
  • Avoid uneven and slippery surfaces
  • Use a rubber floor mat if you stand on hard surfaces for long periods of time

If you do get have an ankle injury, use the R.I.C.E method: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. This can help reduce pain and swelling. Also, make sure to not put any weight on it until you get a chance to have it evaluated by a doctor.

Source: Westshore Primary Care

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